Immersion in Nature

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“A change in environmental microbes can relatively easily affect a well-established microbiome in children, giving their immune system a helping hand in the process”.

Harvard Medical school, and really everyone who has ressearched the subject, recommends time in nature for your health. This might have once been a revolutionary concept, but today in 2021, we all know it, and it’s a matter of motivating people to just get outside, soak in that Vitamin D, and interact with nature in any way available to them. We know that healthy lifestyle and exercise is important, but it goes deeper than that. Like Deep….Down into the dirt.

IT’s important for us, small and tall, BIOLOGICALLY to interact with nature.

Outdoor learning with forest school

University of British Columbia:MAKING ROOM FOR NATURE IN OUR CITIES, FOR OUR MINDS

Ecopsychology: How immersion in Nature Benefits your health.

University of Minnesota: How Does Nature Impact Our Wellbeing?

Nature connects

“According to a series of field studies conducted by Kuo and Coley at the Human-Environment Research Lab, time spent in nature connects us to each other and the larger world. Another study at the University of Illinois suggests that residents in Chicago public housing who had trees and green space around their building reported knowing more people, having stronger feelings of unity with neighbors, being more concerned with helping and supporting each other, and having stronger feelings of belonging than tenants in buildings without trees. In addition to this greater sense of community, they had a reduced risk of street crime, lower levels of violence and aggression between domestic partners, and a better capacity to cope with life’s demands, especially the stresses of living in poverty.

This experience of connection may be explained by studies that used fMRI to measure brain activity.  When participants viewed nature scenes, the parts of the brain associated with empathy and love lit up, but when they viewed urban scenes, the parts of the brain associated with fear and anxiety were activated. It appears as though nature inspires feelings that connect us to each other and our environment”.

References

https://www.sciencealert.com/daycares-in-finland-built-a-backyard-forest-and-it-changed-children-s-immune-systems

https://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/spending-time-outdoors-is-good-for-you

https://www.sciencealert.com/daycares-in-finland-built-a-backyard-forest-and-it-changed-children-s-immune-systems

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